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Africa

Strong measures: getting fiscal on climate change

Weijen Leow's picture
Opening plenary of the Africa Carbon Forum



Albert Einstein once said: “The only source of knowledge is experience.” For years I have wondered about this. Surely you can understand something without actually having done it. After all, mankind’s understanding of the vast universe is greater than what can be directly experienced, and some of it is derived from theoretical reasoning. I was on my way to the 2018 Africa Carbon Forum to share fiscal policy lessons under the CAPE program and the debate was still raging in my head when I arrived at the UN campus in Nairobi Kenya.

How is your life different from that of your parents?

Venkat Gopalakrishnan's picture
© You Ji/World Bank
© You Ji/World Bank


Yunus owns a fabric store in Blantyre, Malawi. The store was founded by his grandfather, who immigrated to Malawi in 1927, and has now been in his family for three generations. Business is good, Yunus said, but that the cost of essential services like electricity and water has gone up since his grandfather and father owned the store. Even so, he remains optimistic.
 
Marija Bosheva is a student at an agriculture and forestry vocational high school in Kavadarci, Macedonia. Like many high school students around the world, she takes daily lessons in history, math, biology, and chemistry. However, unlike many of her peers, she is also studying oenology — the art of making wine.
 
Are you carrying on a family tradition, like Yunus? Do you work or study in an entirely new field that didn’t exist when your parents were your age? How has life changed for you compared to your parents or grandparents when they were your age, and how do you see your children’s lives and possibilities compared to your own? Are you in the same position vis a vis your peers as your parents were vis a vis theirs?
 
Share your story, using the hashtag #InheritPossibility.

Gender-based violence in Rwanda: Getting everyone on board

Rudasingwa Messi Therese's picture

Esta es la segunda de una serie de publicaciones sobre los datos relacionados con los objetivos de desarrollo del milenio (ODM), basados en la edición 2015 de los Indicadores del desarrollo mundial.

El objetivo del desarrollo del milenio número 2  es “Lograr la enseñanza primaria universal”, y se mide en comparación con la meta de “asegurar que, en 2015, los niños y niñas de todo el mundo puedan terminar un ciclo completo de enseñanza primaria”.

 
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Después de un modesto avance hacia el logro de la enseñanza primaria universal en los países más pobres durante la década de los noventa, el progreso se ha acelerado considerablemente desde el año 2000. Solo hace unos pocos años, la consecución de la meta del ODM 2 pareció al alcance, pero la tasa de finalización de la educación primaria se ha estancado en 91 % en los países en desarrollo desde 2009.

Solo dos regiones —Asia oriental y el Pacífico, y Europa y Asia central— han alcanzado o están cerca de alcanzar la enseñanza primaria universal. Oriente Medio y Norte de África ha mejorado de manera constante, hasta llegar al 95 % en 2012, la misma tasa que América Latina y el Caribe. Asia meridional alcanzó el 91 % en 2009, pero el avance desde ese momento ha sido lento. El desafío verdadero sigue existiendo en África al sur del Sahara, que está rezagada con una tasa de finalización de la enseñanza primaria del 70 % al año 2012.

Record high remittances to low- and middle-income countries in 2017

Dilip Ratha's picture
Energy commodity prices gained 1 percent in March—led by a 1 percent increase in crude oil prices, the World Bank’s Pink Sheet reported.

Non-energy prices fell almost 1 percent due to a drop in metal prices. Agricultural prices increased 1 percent, largely on higher cocoa prices (+18 percent), maize and soybean meal (+5 percent each), as well as cotton and soybeans (+4 percent each). Fertilizer prices rose more than 1 percent, led by TSP (triple superphosphate) (+3 percent) and DAP (diammonium phosphate) (+2 percent).

Metals prices dropped 5 percent, led by iron ore prices (-9 percent), zinc and lead (-7 percent each), and aluminum (-5 percent).

Precious metals prices were marginally down due to a 1 percent decline in silver prices.

The Pink Sheet is a monthly report that monitors commodity price movements.
 

Source: World Bank.
 

Community involvement can help end GBV in Kenya

Janes Amondi Owuor's picture

We're delighted to release the 2017 Global Findex, the third round of the world's most detailed dataset of how adults save, borrow, make payments, and manage risk.

Drawing on surveys with more than 150,000 adults in more than 140 economies worldwide, the latest Global Findex features new data on fintech transactions made through mobile phones and the internet. It also provides time series updates for benchmark financial inclusion indicators.

The data shows that financial inclusion is on the rise globally, with 1.2 billion adults opening accounts since 2011, including 515 million in the last three years alone. That means 69 percent of adults globally have an account, up from 62 percent in 2014 and 51 percent in 2011. We see that Fintech, or financial technology, plays a progressively greater role in countries like China, where 50% of account owners use a mobile phone to make a transaction from their account. Compared to 2014, twice as many adults in Brazil and Kenya are paying utility bills digitally.

Village gender teams can sensitize communities against gender-based violence

Tendo Namata's picture

The existing evidence from both cross-country and country case studies on the determinants of foreign bank entry and on the impact of foreign banks on host economies suggests the brick-and-mortar operations of international banks have important implications for competition and efficiency of the local financial sectors and for financial stability and access to credit in the host country (World Bank, 2018). The Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018: Bankers without Borders contributes to the policy dialogue on international banks by summarizing what has been learned so far about: i) the risks and opportunities posed by foreign banks when entering developing countries and ii) under what circumstances host economies can reap most benefits from the entry of international banks.

Announcing the 2018 World Bank #Blog4Dev contest winners!

Diarietou Gaye's picture

This is the third in a series of posts on data related the Millennium Development Goals based on the 2015 Edition of World Development Indicators.

Millennium Development Goal 3  is to "Promote gender equality and empower women" and is measured against a target to "Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education, preferably by 2005, and in all levels of education no later than 2015" and also includes indicators to measure the proportion of seats held by women in national parliament and the share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector.

Since 1990, the number of women in parliament has quadrupled in the Middle East and North Africa

Chart 1

More women are participating in public life and decision making at the highest levels than in 1990, based on the proportion of parliamentary seats held by women. Latin America and the Caribbean leads developing country regions in 2014, at 29 percent, followed closely by Sub-Saharan Africa at 22 percent. The biggest change has occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, where the proportion of seats held by women more than quadrupled between 1990 and 2014 . At the country level Rwanda leads the way with 64 percent in 2014, higher than the percentage for high- income countries, at 26 percent.






Breaking the vicious cycle of high inequality and slow job creation

Sébastien Dessus's picture


As we take part in the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign over the coming weeks, we couldn’t be more excited about sharing an update than this one.

We recently brought a team of technologically savvy students together and worked hard for two days with very little sleep to develop an application to respond to sexual violence. The hard work paid off when our team was awarded first place in a Hackathon at the American University of Central Asia (AUCA).

Children with disabilities can flourish in society, and education helps them get there

Simona Palummo's picture
Photo: World Cocoa Foundation.


For five years now, the global community has been observing the International Day of Forests on March 21. It is an occasion to celebrate the wide range of economic and social benefits that forests and trees bring to humankind. Since joining the World Cocoa Foundation (WCF) as its president in July 2016, I have been paying lots of attention to forests in West Africa, which is the world’s leading source of cocoa. These tropical forests, and others like them around the world, play an indispensable role in fighting global climate change by storing carbon. They also meet vital local needs, by cooling temperatures, helping generate rainfall, and purifying the air and water. Healthy forests help rural communities thrive. The paradox is that, over the last 10 years, life-giving forests in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana were felled at an alarming rate as cocoa farmers, faced with challenges such as low prices, climate change, and low productivity, have expanded the land area on which they grow cocoa. The crop, essential for the chocolate and cocoa products that many of us love, is now seen as a major driver of deforestation in these countries.

Reaching for the SDGs: the untapped potential of Tanzania’s water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector

George Joseph's picture
写真: Evan Blaser/Flickr
ペルーとエクアドルが抱える災害リスクの中でも特に大きな問題は、都市への人口集中と地震災害に対する脆弱性です。2007年、ペルー南部の沖合でマグニチュード8.0の地震が発生し、520人の命を奪い、数え切れないほどの建物が損壊しました。2016年にエクアドルで起きた最近の地震の犠牲者数は200人を超え、さらに多くの人が負傷しました。

もちろん、こうしたリスクは中南米の国だけに存在するわけではありません。世界有数の地震多発国である日本は、耐震性に関して他に例を見ない経験を培ってきました。国による地震リスクの管理体制の要となってきたのは交通セクターです。地震が交通インフラとその運営、乗客の安全に与えるであろう影響の大きさを考えれば、それも当然のことと言えるでしょう。

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