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The World Region

Surgical care – an overlooked entity in health systems

Emi Suzuki's picture

Five billion peopletwo thirds of world populationlack access to safe and affordable surgical, anesthesia and obstetric (SAO) care while a third of the global burden of disease requires surgical and/or anesthesia decision-making or treatment. Treating the sick very often requires surgery and anesthesia. Despite such huge burden of disease, safe and affordable SAO care is often overlooked.

Why? It may be because surgery and anesthesia are not disease entities. They are treatment modalities that address the breadth of human disease — infections, non-communicable, maternal, child, geriatric and trauma-related disease and injuries, and international development agencies have been focusing on vertical disease-based programs.

Prior to 2015, global data on surgery, anesthesia and obstetric care was virtually nonexistent. With the idea that “We can’t manage what we don’t measure”, the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery developed six Surgical, Obstetric and Anesthesia (SAO) indicators (discussed here) and collected data for them. The analysis of these data show large gaps in SAO care across countries by income groups.

There are 70-times as many surgical workers per 100,000 people in high-income countries compared with low-income countries

The SAO or “surgical” workforce is extremely small in low-income countries (1 SAOs per 100,000 population) and lower middle-income countries (10 SAOs per 100,000 population) whereas there are 69 SAOs per 100,000 population in high-income countries. The discrepancy between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries is even greater for surgical workforce density than that of physician density.

Making taxes work for the SDGs

Jan Walliser's picture
Also available in: Français
Graphic: World Bank Group

Taxation plays a fundamental role in effectively raising and allocating domestic resources for governments to deliver essential public services and achieve broader development goals.

Game-changers and whistle-blowers: taxing wealth

Jim Brumby's picture
Also available in: Français 

High and rising income inequality is a serious concern in many countries, as highlighted in the IMF’s recent Fiscal Monitor. Wealth, however, is distributed even more unequally than income, as in the picture below.

Measuring surgical systems worldwide: an update

Parisa Kamali's picture
Photo: Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank

Five billion people—two thirds of world population—lack access to safe and affordable surgical, obstetric and anesthesia care with low and middle income countries (LMICs) taking a lead.1-3 Surgical care is a crucial component of building strong health systems and one that is often overlooked (Dr. Jim Kim UHC 2017 video). All people are entitled to quality essential health services, no matter who they are, where they live, or how much money they have. This simple but powerful belief underpins the growing movement towards universal health coverage (UHC), a global commitment under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Inherent in the framework of UHC is access to safe surgical, obstetric and anesthesia (SOA) care.

An estimated 33 million undergo financial hardship every year from the direct costs of surgical care. And those are the individuals fortunate enough to have access to care.4 Moreover, about 11% of the world’s disability-adjusted life years are attributable to diseases that are often treated with surgery such as heart and cerebrovascular diseases, cancer, and injuries from road traffic accidents.2,5 Other surgically treatable disorders such as obstructed labour, obstetric fistulas, and congenital birth defects are major causes of morbidity and mortality in the developing world.5,7 The delivery of safe and quality SOA care is critical for the realization of many of the Sustainable Development Goals, including: Good health and well-being (Goal 3); No poverty (Goal 1); Gender equality (Goal 5), and Reducing inequalities (Goal 10).

Wrong criticisms of Doing Business

Shanta Devarajan's picture

While I welcome criticism and comments on the Doing Business (DB) report—or any other data and research product of the World Bank, for that matter—I find Justin Sandefur’s and Divyanshi Wadhwa’s (SW) recent blog posts on DB in Chile and India neither enlightening nor useful. 

Conversations with Chatbots: Exploring AI’s Potential for Development

Haishan Fu's picture

Development work is getting more technologically sophisticated by the day. The World Bank’s Information and Technology Solutions (ITS) department recently started an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Initiative. At the launch event, we explored the role of AI in development and what it might mean for the work that we do here at the Bank. In short: AI is already here, international organizations have an important role to play, and we need to invest in our skills and expertise.

AI is already being incorporated into development projects

A growing family of Artificial Intelligence techniques are being employed in development. Using machine learning for classification and prediction tasks is becoming as routine as running regressions. Our team recently launched a data science competition on poverty prediction and has been evaluating the performance of different machine learning algorithms. This includes the use of automated machine learning where the machine itself helps to select and tune models in a way a data scientist ordinarily would.

Most commodity prices surged in January, led by energy–Pink Sheet

John Baffes's picture
Energy commodity prices surged 9 percent in January, the seventh monthly gain in a row, led by an almost 30 percent increase in U.S. natural gas prices, the World Bank’s Pink Sheet reported.

Non-energy prices made solid advances as well, with metals and minerals prices gaining more than 5 percent, also the seventh consecutive monthly increase, and a five-year high. Nickel and zinc, up 12 and 8 percent respectively, led the rise.

Precious metals climbed nearly 6 percent, with similar gains in gold and silver.

Agricultural prices, which had been stable for nearly 2 years, increased more than 2 percent, led by advances in rice (+9 percent) and cotton (+5 percent). Fertilizer prices rose over 1 percent, led by DAP (+3 percent) and Urea (+2 percent).

The Pink Sheet is a monthly report that monitors commodity price movements.
All commodity price indexes gained in January, led by energy
Source: World Bank.

Your Cow, Plant, Fridge and Elevator Can Talk to You (But Your Kids Still Won’t!)

Raka Banerjee's picture
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The Internet of Things (IoT) heralds a new world in which everything (well, almost everything) can now talk to you, through a combination of sensors and analytics. Cows can tell you when they’d like to be milked or when they’re sick, plants can tell you about their soil conditions and light frequency, your fridge can tell you when your food is going bad (and order you a new carton of milk), and your elevator can tell you how well it’s functioning.

At the World Bank, we’re looking at all these things (Things?) from a development angle. That’s the basis behind the new report, “Internet of Things: The New Government to Business Platform”, which focuses on how the Internet of Things can help governments deliver services better. The report looks at the ways that some cities have begun using IoT, and considers how governments can harness its benefits while minimizing potential risks and problems.

In short, it’s still the Wild West in terms of IoT and governments. The report found lots of IoT-related initiatives (lamppost sensors for measuring pollution, real-time transit updates through GPS devices, sensors for measuring volumes in garbage bins), but almost no scaled applications. Part of the story has to do with data – governments are still struggling how to collect and manage the vast quantities of data associated with IoT, and issues of data access and valuation also pose problems.

Chart: Economic Development and the Composition of Wealth

Tariq Khokhar's picture

The composition of wealth fundamentally changes with economic development. Natural capital—energy, minerals, land and forests—is the largest component of wealth in low-income countries. Its value goes up, but its share of total wealth decreases as economies develop. By contrast, the share of human capital, estimated as the present value of future incomes for the labor force, increases as economies develop. Overall, human capital accounts for two-thirds of the wealth of nations. Read more in The Changing Wealth of Nations


Chart: Global Wealth Grew 66% Between 1995 and 2014

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Global wealth grew by 66% between 1995 and 2014 to a total of over 1,140 Trillion dollars. The share of the world’s wealth held by middle-income countries is growing — it increased from 19% to 28% between 1995 and 2014, while the share of high-income OECD countries fell from 75% to 65%. Read more in The Changing Wealth of Nations